Google Uses Emotions to Sell Their User Experience

Muppets Rocket Out in Google+ Hangout

Google focusing on communicating their brand via emotions in new ads and less on tech, gadgetry, and search terms. Using emotions to communicate over features is a brilliant move. Communicating by getting people to identify with you or your product through their user experiences, ALWAYS works.

Read NYTimes.com article: “Google’s Ad Campaign Uses Emotions, Not Search Terms”.

Google Chrome: Dear Sophie


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A Walk Around the Block: Patterns and Oddities

Feeling antsy and uncreative on this Friday afternoon (or maybe because it is Friday afternoon), I went for a short walk around the block for some fresh air and to clear my head. I’ve been working on constructing a revised information architecture (IA) for our site and have been jotting down and reviewing patterns and content groups (objects) and actions that can be performed on those objects.

What’s more intuitive, a action-centric or content centric navigation? Or maybe it’s a hybrid. Trying to figure out the best IA to facilitate intuitive access to content and primary actions. That’s almost a mouthful.

During my short walk, I started to notice some oddities and patterns. Some patterns make sense because you expect it and some don’t, but it doesn’t mean they don’t belong. Sometimes the surprise element can encourage positive activity and thought.

Here are iPhone snapshots from my walk:

The Greatest Show on Earth: Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus Train

What are the odds that I’d see this? It conjured up all sorts of childhood imagery.

The Greatest Show on Earth. Went through the chain link fence to snap a picture.
The Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey train just happened to be resting on the tracks by the office.

Patterns and Textures

A good IA is also about recognizable patterns and surprises.

Park bench. Did the designer purposely match the bench shape to the pavers?
Something soothing about the vertical bands with the square windows.
Directly leading the user: Walk this way... really... this way.
Subtly leading the user: Crack in the wall to the cactus in the window
Texture

Just Wondering…

Is someone really going to wear these again?

I should go for a walk every afternoon.